You Were One of Them, Once

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I try very hard to not use this blog as a vehicle for pointless ranting, but on occasion, I just have to get it out. Today I read that some airlines are now having child-free seating. I have high hopes for asshole-free seating, but the screening process may be too subjective. I’m fed up with people complaining about everything under the sun, but the vitriolic rants unleashed about children and parents alike are getting out of hand.

I don’t have a natural affinity for kids. I’ll be honest. I’m fond of quiet environments. I don’t like my seat being kicked or finding stray boogers attached to arm rests. But, holy shit, when did our intolerance for humankind become so high that we now need to travel in our own little bubbles?

I don’t think my little darling is the center of the universe (mine perhaps, but not everyone else’s). When she was a toddler, I had to swiftly escort her from a grocery store when she had a temper tantrum. Of course, I did not escape without being glared at – it was humiliating.  Parenting is hard, but apparently being a spectator is even worse. And please don’t regale me with bullshit tales about how your parents beat you into submission or silenced you with a glance. And that you never acted up or were tired or hungry or scared. You need to sit in the memory-free section, apparently.

Intolerance has reached an all-time high in our society, where people are allowed to sue and rail against and be indignant about and indulged over every petty little irritant, all while living in their annoying and hypocritical glass houses, yakking on their cell phones and snipping their toenail clippings off in every direction. Humans are annoying. Little humans are annoying, too – they’re just slightly more ignorant about that fact.

Kids aren’t for everyone. I get it. But neither are crabby old people and boorish salesmen and perfume-y blabbers or depressed slackers who smell like smoke or uptight business people attached to their umbilical cords of technology and miniature booze bottles. Everyone likes to think that they are models of decorum, even if they whistle when they breathe, crack their knuckles, shake their leg nervously, expel heavy sighs every two minutes or have to get up to pee every five. Loud people, smelly people, cranky people, lonely people – which are you today and why should I put up with it?

I’ll tell you why. Because none of us are any more special than the other. We’re humans. I am a naturally irritable person and I have a low sensory tolerance for all kinds of shit. But is that your problem? Are your behaviors any less legitimate than my pissiness? It’s on me to cultivate compassion and tolerance. It is my responsibility. What someone else does, unless it endangers my safety, is a gift, an everyday challenge to my abilities to be tolerant, to not rage, to not believe that my space and time should be an inviolate temperature-controlled soundproof buffer zone at all times.

There’s a lot of people on this planet. Airlines are doing their best to keep a flailing industry aloft by screwing over their economy passengers with miniscule seat space and a passenger starvation plan. I get claustrophobic just looking at the picture of airline seats. I’m pretty sure as kids, most of us weren’t shoved elbows to ass into a tin can and asked to respect each others’ space/privacy/knees jammed into the back of the seat.

They’re creating box seats for the corporate elite and are growing a segregated seating system. Does anybody remember sucking secondhand smoke during an entire flight? With how many more irritations will we feed airlines’ sagging bottom lines? They are doing their damnedest to turn us all into intolerant jerks. I want, I deserve, you have no right to, you shouldn’t… It reminds me of Dr. Doolittle’s Pushmi-pullyu with decency stuck squarely in the middle. This sense of entitlement to a pristine environment is a losing game on a planet with 7+ billion people.

We’re getting ready to take our daughter on her first airline flight this next year. The intolerant better hope they don’t end up sitting next to me. They’ll wish they’d purchased a ticket in the snore and vomit-free seating section.

71 Comments on “You Were One of Them, Once

  1. I don’t remember kids being such targets when I was a kid and we weren’t all crammed in like sardines. Flying is a miserable experience now and we have airlines to thank for it. Not kids. You are absolutely right.

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    • I agree that flying is miserable and the airlines are setting up patently false barriers to annoyances to charge more. And I really don’t get the disconnect in the human race between its adults and its young. Are we, like gerbils, going to eat them eventually?

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    • I loathe the term “child-free”, like it’s a malady. It’s very discriminatory and marginalizing. I understand that people with and without kids can feel defensive, but it seems unnecessarily divisive.

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        • I think it’s probably worth noting that the airline in the article is a foreign airline. I’m not sure the airlines in the US could do this, since they receive government subsidies.

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      • [blush] I confess to using the term “child-free” instead of “childless” because “childless” sounds like a malady if not an outright tragedy, and way too many casual acquaintances and near-strangers worked very hard to get me to “correct” my “problem.”

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        • I read your post today and enjoyed it. I think there’s a tendency in public discourse to shorthand things and it can be very reductionist. I don’t like the term childless, either.

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  2. Love it! We sat next to a baby on the 12 hours home from Mexico, we were a bit worried but she was good as gold! Slept the whole way and even played silently with us smiling at the faces we made. I don’t mind babies on planes, or children, because I am a nervous flyer and I do feel for them on this brand new experience.
    What irritates me, however is when these little boys and girls grow up into teenagers, with blaring music out of their phones on the bus. Buy some chuffing headphones. I am tempted to collect all the free ones I get along the way and hand them out. And back to flying, I am a nervous flyer – but I do not squeal at every little bit of turbulence like some teenagers I’ve seen on planes. That’s my annoyance, much more than little kids, is teenagers on transport!

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    • I think your comment brings up a very good point – what annoys each and every one of us is subjective. Targeting children because they are easier to identify and quantify, seems easy and discriminatory.

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  3. Lol. I loved this rant. I’m not a parent but I enjoy the company of kids. And as a business traveler, I enjoy sitting around kids, especially toddlers who have never flown before–they can make it very exciting for everyone around them. On one of my last flights I sat next to a fellow business traveler who complained about our fellow passengers as they boarded, not to me, but loudly to someone on his cell phone. He did not speak to me unless you consider his cacophony of snores communication. And as he consumed glass after glass of crap red wine, he came very close to drenching my laptop and my attire. How about an inconsiderate lout-free zone?

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    • I am a parent and don’t often enjoy the company of other people’s kids. I’m pretty sure they’re not that fond of me, either. If we start with this nonsense,though, why not have a non-drinking zone and a non-ball scratching zone and a non-manicure zone. We are an annoying species. I don’t think there’s enough room on the plane for all the zones that could be required!

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      • True! But then maybe we’d also get the cute bubble cabins of first class some airlines are moving towards. Everyone in their own pod!

        One thing I would like to see on the plane is better attire. Unless you’re under 6, pajamas are not ok. And if you knew how germy those seats are, you wouldn’t consider wearing bootie shorts. Maybe the airlines could make money by selling coveralls.

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  4. Where does it end? Can we specify flights which are free from drunken, boorish idiots? Or ones where people don’t flagrantly ignore the carry-on baggage size rules?

    I’ve taken our kids on a handful of flights, and while they’ve been a bit bored and loud on occasion I don’t believe they were particularly disruptive. It’s not like they were running up and down the aisles screaming or anything. In my experience, the vast majority of parents are mortified when their kids start playing up on flights, but what are they supposed to do? Stay at home? Get on a ship?

    Discrimination like this is beyond pathetic, particularly in economy seating. If you’re really that put off by my not overly loud kids on a flight, then please feel free to pay the difference to upgrade them to first or business. Thank you.

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    • I think that’s the question we do need to ask. Where does it end? I have been on flights with screaming babies, Greyhound buses with the pot smokers toking away in the back, subways soaked in body odor and potentially urine. Now we’re getting so sterile in our “requirements” that we no longer associate with the human condition.

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  5. Great post. While your focus is on intolerance of children–which my 3-year-old son and I have certainly weathered–your commentary on the state of our entitled, indignant culture is a much-needed message that I hope many hear.

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    • I really was trying to get at that point, but it might have been lost in my rant as a parent. When I talk to people who have traveled abroad, it’s an entirely different experience. People are dirty, dusty and smelly. They’re jostled and crowded and loud. But it’s a sensory life – the whole spectrum of the human condition is experienced. We’ve gone a little nuts in this country.

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  6. Ugh, you are right about all those OTHER annoyances, which I have seen, heard, and been disgusted by as well. My first flight was at age 1 and since my Dad was usually stationed overseas, I had a lot of childhood flights. There really was a sense of decorum then, despite the ubiquitous cigarette smoke. People dressed well, not in sweatpants; I recall several flights in itchy dresses that I hated. The crew was actually PLEASANT, imagine! My brother got to see the cockpit on one flight – being a girl I was not invited, but I did get a set of wings (see, not EVERYTHING was great about the old days).

    Fast-forward to adult me, traveling on business. I had so many frequent-flyer miles that I usually could get upgraded to Business Class for the long-haul flights, aaahhh… no, wait… is this ratty guy in the cutoff shorts sitting next to me? And… using the airline blanket to CLEAN HIS TEETH? I will never use an airline blanket again (was already toting my own camp pillow). And yeah… snoring, nose-whistling, smells, nail-clipping… from people who should know better, but don’t. Or don’t care. “What? I’m not bothering you.”

    And that’s the problem!! We have become so numerous, at the same time that courtesy has been replaced with selfishness, and at the same time that services like flying have become so financially accessible, that basically, we have turned into a bunch of cattle moooing around in a jostling herd, and giving and taking offense. It does not help that the airlines treat us accordingly.

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    • You are so on point with “we have turned into a bunch of cattle moooing around in a jostling herd, and giving and taking offense.” I see several roads to be taken in dealing with public behavior. Avoid human contact. Choose the lesser of evils (car or ship versus plane). Or learning how to lead by example.
      I think one of the things I am really working at, to overcome my sensory irritations, is humanizing people that are around me. Smiling, making eye contact, sharing a snack, starting a conversation, playing peekaboo with the slobbering baby. It’s really our only defense against being constantly enraged or indignant. Sometimes it doesn’t work and I have to go somewhere else in my head, but ofttimes it has not only evaporated or lessened the irritation, but it has made my journey more enjoyable.

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  7. Interesting rant and I thoroughly agree with your sentiments. Coming from Australia, most of our flights are long-haul (4 hrs just to cross the country, 6hrs + 12hrs flying time to get to Europe). This means traveling with young children is very very stressful. I have travelled with my own and experienced that, but I also see most children are normally behaved & not a problem on flights, its their poor parents who worry and end up stressed out by the time they land. I once saw a couple arguing after a long flight (one of the 12hr ones) because their toddler started crying during the last hour of so. I just felt like going up to them and saying “hey, don’t worry about it, she’s been fine and most people feel more sorry for you because you’re so tired!”.

    On the other hand, I read an interesting article the other day about being able to enjoy time in an ‘adult’ environment, such as a restaurant or club, without having other peoples children running around like the whole place is a playground, which I also agree with. I think there are times and places where children do need to be controlled, and consideration needs to be given to other patrons and their desire for a peaceful environment, but more importantly their parents need to learn to either control them or not bring them to that place if they are going to bother other people. I’m talking about places like maybe a fine dining restaurant, etc. However, public transport is not one of those places, it is a necessity and children (and their parents) should not be discriminated against.

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    • I wish people would give into the inclination to say to struggling parents “Hey, it’s okay, we’ve all been there” (even if you haven’t, it’s just kind).
      I have mixed feelings about the scenarios you describe. I’d never take my child to an “adult environment”, but I’m not comfortable ranting about other parents and their children running amok. It happens. I think it probably doesn’t happen often and if someone is consistently having that experience, maybe they’re going to the wrong places. I’ve rarely gone somewhere with the expectation that humans won’t annoy. I know it’s my issue to deal with and if I’m bothered by human interactions, I better not go places with other humans.
      Consideration should always be a priority in public, but my idea of consideration and someone else’s might be quite different. And there are people who are completely oblivious to even common courtesies. I don’t have the energy or inclination to try and fix them. I can only be responsible for me and my lot. I love the Buddhist approach of not being hooked by other people’s actions or emotions. It seems like a tough skill to learn, but how liberating it must be!

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      • I think there is a tendency these days (in some countries, and this seems to be the case in Australia) for many parents to not discipline their children or teach them how to behave with courtesy. Those same parents seem to think that their children have the right to go where they want and behave how they want, even if they are causing disturbing other people unnecessarily. I think it is fair and reasonable to have appropriate places for children to be able to run, climb, yell, just be kids basically, and there are equally inappropriate places and times for them to do this. If it occurs on public transport, well that’s life, in reality it doesn’t occur that often so I think its reasonable not to make an issue of it. However, I see instances where some parents think it is appropriate for their child to behave this way unchecked in environments where it is not appropriate, where they are actually preventing other people enjoying a particular event or place. I do think there is a subset of parents around these days who are oblivious to common courtesies and further, when pointed out to them, come back with an indignant and entitled response, and that’s what I don’t agree with.

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        • I can’t really speak from any experience other than my own. On occasion, I’ve thought “wow, do you have a leash?” However, I tend to meet more annoying adults on a regular basis than I do children or families.

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  8. I couldn’t agree more. I remember the time when my son was a toddler and we had to fly intercontinentally for my work…when he started to cry a few hours into the flight the flight attendant took him into the cockpit to see the pilot… Today, not only do they talk about “child-free” flights but most airlines have already moved the boarding of families travelling with babies and toddlers from pre-boarding to “after zone 2” or something similar. This was because the business travellers complained that the moms and pops with kids boarded before them. I’m such a traveller and got a survey about this issue….I told them not to change the practice of pre-boarding families with small kids, but apparently I belong to the minority on this issue…This happened last year. Sad.

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    • I’m sure it’s an economic device to cater to their biggest moneymaking client base. I just think it speaks to the larger societal issue of feeding the animosity of one group against another. And then charging extra for it.
      As I respond to comments and go further down this rabbit hole, it just makes me sad. We work so hard to separate ourselves into “us” and “them” piles, as if there is no other way.

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  9. And we wonder why there’s a growth in “bubble-wrap parenting.” We as adults are being programmed not only to protect ourselves from anything and everything that causes a second of discomfort, but to also segregate ourselves when we could be the ones associated with causing others discomfort. God forbid our kids ever experience or be expected to experience even a second of discomfort. That would be bad parenting.

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    • Good point. I hadn’t really thought about that aspect of things. I focus on my daughter developing good coping and stress management skills. I think that really is the point of parenting – teaching our children survival skills so they can move effectively in the world. They can’t learn those skills in a bubble.

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  10. I’m with you: I like my quiet, my space, and my own habits. I have kids and sometimes they drive me nuts, so I encourage them to treat others with respect and behave appropriately in public. We all have issues, it’s just how tolerant/respectful we are of others that creates strife. Often it seems like a sense of entitlement (money paid) for a position equates free-range bad habits. Who do people feel they are, especially in comparison to everyone else?

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    • It’s likely that wherever you go, there are going to be people who aren’t mindful of others. I am just trying to walk the less confrontational and useful line of working on my own reactions to it. I don’t expect businesses or institutions to legitimize my complaints about irritants, except when it comes to safety or behavior that impacts everyone else to their detriment. As you can see from the comments, what irritates people varies widely and not surprisingly, it isn’t always children.

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      • What you say is so true: often we think children are the most offensive group of society. But those children grow up into adults and sometimes don’t change their behaviors.

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  11. Along the same lines, maybe you can help me work through something. I was at my 18-year-old daughter’s basketball game, and during the warmup and timeouts, the AV was playing gangster rap, with all the ugliness, sexual, profane and racial language therein. I feel it’s a simple matter of civility to not play music in a public venue that will potentially offend and embarrass a good number of people. Or am I just being intolerant and me-me-me like the “child-free” proponents?

    “Memory-free section” is a super line, by the way.

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    • You ask a tough question. When is something deemed offensive or irritating enough to take action? I wrestle with that. I’m surprised in a school venue that somebody wouldn’t have the good sense to pay attention to what is coming over the loudspeaker. That would most likely be when I’d contact an administrator and make the point that a school game has a wide audience that might not need to increase their vocabulary. Grandma and little preschooler Billy probably don’t need to add ‘hos’ to theirs.
      Years ago, I went to a kid festival where the DJ was playing adult-themed music (Really – I have to explain booty call to my 3 year old?). I got on the board for the festival for the following year and that was changed. I’m not a prude – I just have a sense of context. But again, that’s another problem. My idea of boundaries and context might be very different from the next person’s.
      I think I do see a difference in politely asking to change seats or pick different music or that your child stop drooling applesauce on my pant leg. It’s local, it’s personal and it’s actionable. Maybe it’s still someone feeling entitled. Shit. Thanks for that question, Ross, now my head will explode.

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      • I know what you mean. I’m trying to write it out and I’m stuck at the “what’s my point” point. I nearly did complain and then thought, “Shit, am I really going to be that guy? The Complainer? The Offended?”

        I just want people to think about the people around them. Civility!

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        • Civility is key, but I worry about when manners have to be institutionalized and enforced and paid for.
          I would be “that guy” with the inappropriate music, but if my request didn’t take care of the problem, I wouldn’t sue the school district. Those are my boundaries, I guess.

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  12. Love this post! I join you in your rant, in your general pissiness, and dislike of children (although we are both parents). I’ve been on a few flights with my kids. They have been both angelic and downright unmanageable, depending on their moods. We’ve gotten golden reviews on good flights (‘You get the best baby award!), to stony silence on bad ones. I once heard a comedian do a bit about the baby-complainers – ‘Let’s cut your tongue out and stick you up at 30,000 feet and see what kind of sounds you make!’ My daughter once got 30 minutes into a two-hour flight and decided she’d had enough. She was only about 18 months, but she skuh-reamed through the rest of the flight, biting me, headbutting me, refusing all comfort as I physically blocked her against the bulwark of the plane. I think the only reason the other passengers didn’t strap a parachute on us and toss us out the emergency exit was that I was visibly pregnant with my second child. These situations are unfortunately only met with empathy if another person has been through what you’ve been through. I used to ask my Mom what my Grandmother did with her brood when they were out and about. Her answer was, ‘Well, we didn’t go anywhere.’ But we are a much more mobile society now, and I’m sorry fellow humans, but there are only so many fourteen-hour drives to Grandma and Grandpa’s that I can take before I decide that the plane trip is worth it. Nut up, everyone, and if you have a better idea – you take my kid during a flight, if you’re so smart.

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    • I have a pretty well-behaved kid for the most part, but whenever someone says “Your daughter behaves so well”, I’m tempted to shoot them down with a scathing remark like “well, it must be those 3 hour beatings” or “you, too, although you might have dressed a little better under the circumstances.” I don’t know why I’m like that. Something rankles me about it, like they’re talking as if she’s a pet, not a person. Which reminds me of yet another snarky comment, “Yes and she cleans up her own poop!”. There might be something wrong with me.

      Good point about how mobile we are as a society. All kinds of people are now showing up on public transportation. And thank you for a new phrase for me to use inappropriately – “nut up”. Very funny!

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  13. I am not a parent, and a youngster on a plane can sometimes make a fuss, but when you consider the length of time that you have to be in the same space it seems silly to worry about it. I would never want a fellow traveler to think their kids were not wonderful. I find the current restrictions a bit silly. I want to get my niece back here to visit. She’s wonderfully well spoken and mature for her age and at 12 she cannot fly without an adult even if mom and I meet her at both ends on most airlines. If you can find an airline they want to charge you a ridiculous fee for the privilege of seating her.

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    • I’ve seen kids, like adults, all along the spectrum of public conduct. Nobody gets any prizes, so we need to be cautious about segregating people based on their ages. I don’t know much about current restrictions since it’s been a few years since I’ve flown (we’ve been doing driving vacations every year). What’s the age requirement for kids to fly alone?

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      • You are so right about that. It depends on the airline – most need to be 13-15 to qualify for an unaccompanied child fare.

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  14. Someone wake me up when asshole-free flights and asshole-free dining is finally available.

    The fuck. I mean, I’ve been on flights where some kids have acted like Satan’s heathens, but that’s something I’ll pin on the parents, and not the kids. When my daughter is out at the playground or some play area, and some pint-sized fuck nut is acting a giant fool, I’ll take him by the collar and lead him to his parents. “Yours?” I’ll ask his befuddled parents. Do a better fucking job of parenting.

    But to suggest a child-free zone, as if children are to blame, that’s just insane.

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    • I think the mentality is a bit worrying – the disconnect from all the different segments of society, as if we weren’t from the same species.

      They say it takes a village to raise a child, but apparently it only takes a Gus on the playground. You won’t mind if I roundhouse kick you to the head if you grab my kid, right? She rarely behaves like a fuck nut, but you never know.

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      • I wouldn’t think your kid would act like a fuck nut on the playground, so I’d be exempt from the wrath of your roundhouse. But there have been plenty of idiot kids that have tried to use my daughter as a punching bag. Hence me grabbing these shit stains by the scruff of their necks.

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  15. I’m thinking that we should just package all assholes who want to ride a plane inside a dry cleaning bag and choke the assholic-ness out of them…

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    • Really? I just want to hand them all kittens and chocolate bars. No wait, that’s me. Okay, let’s go with suffocating them. On the other hand, one person’s asshole is another person’s darling. Very subjective detection process. Likely we’d all end up asphyxiated.

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  16. This was an excellent post. Thank you! Given a choice, I would prefer a screaming child to a sloppy drunk on a plane anytime!

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  17. Great post. This reminds me of when I was first married and we looked at an apartment. The landlord was very clear that we could not have children or pets. The subtext of the message was that they were basically in the same category. I’d have rather been in a cardboard box on the street. The issue is tolerance and we have become a society of demanding and entitled whiners. We don’t want kids on the plane, we don’t want fat people on the plane, and what ‘s next? I’m with Gus– I want the asshole free flight.

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    • I think that’s where the problem is – once we start separating ourselves on annoyance or inconvenience factors, there’s no end to it. And the overarching message about how we think of our young is a bit startling. I have to admit, before I had a child, I never realized the many attitudes people cultivated about them. I’m amazed at the discourse about how we need to educate them, not screw them over with national debt, protect them from pedophiles, but when push comes to shove (thank you airlines), some people seem to feel a lot of animosity about kids.

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  18. If you are entitled to bring your kids on flights, why am I not entitled to a quiet flight? Does an airline offering child-free flights really signal doom for a child-bearing populace?

    And, yes, there was a time when children were generally better behaved because it was expected and demanded of them. Now it isn’t (all part of our entitled society, don’t you know), and they generally don’t.

    I am totally with you on the entitled society thing, but much less on the exactly point of airline travel. Perhaps reducing entitlement means also reducing the extreme freedom many accord their children.

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    • I haven’t met the pillaging, rampaging kids you are referencing and I resent the broad brush that children are painted with when, like many parents I know, I am working my ass off to raise a well-behaved child who will certainly be much kinder and considerate than the tremendous number of fully grown jerks I’ve met.

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      • I don’t think it is using a broad brush to acknowledge that such children do exist (or perhaps more properly, are raised by less than capable or less than concerned parents). I also don’t think “pillaging, rampaging kids” is a fair reflection of what I said.

        I absolutely do agree that sometimes one is subjected to adults who are less than pleasant. I’ve had plenty of movies and concerts ruined by such folks. I would pay extra if a movie theatre or concert were able to reject such or was willing to deal with them (and often there is a level of behavior that will get you thrown out).

        I just don’t see what is so bad about an airline offering adult-only flights. There are other airlines and other flights. If there are people who don’t wish to fly with small children, and they are wiling to pay for it, … so what?

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  19. Here, here!!
    I have high-energy, difficult, loud, silly kids. I try my hardest to keep them behaved and occupied with books, toys, and art supplies when we go to restaurants or other public places. I explain expectations in advance. I deliver swift consequences (we have left many restaurants and grocery stores abruptly). I reward good behavior with compliments and the occasional bribe.
    But my children are perennially the ones who get the “look” from childless adults and even other parents. Sometimes I want to tell them, “Think how much more awful they would be if I’d given up?!”
    Parenting is hard. I don’t want to hear, “It’s your choice.” First, reproduction is a natural, human thing. It’s driven by instinct and culture. Second, there is no way anybody could ever predict how difficult and demanding and CONSTANT it is before they’ve had children of their own. Third, aren’t we supposed to be a community? Please, anybody, smile at my kid and distract them for a minute.
    Things like this airline policy make me worried that parents and families will be penalized even more–that instead of paying a premium for child-free flights, the reverse will start to happen, because families are the captive audience. It’s already expensive enough to raise a child, and then compounded with lost work due to sick kids, the ‘mommy track’ making it more difficult for mothers to get promoted at work (this is weighing heavily on my mind because I have a job interview tomorrow and my son has been sick and my husband is out of town on a business trip).

    I like it when you use your blog for rants. I wouldn’t even call them rants–they are thoughtful, analytical social commentary with personal reflection.

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    • I think the psychology driving all this is disturbing. When I see policies or social attitudes shift to pit “us” against “them”(whatever the groups are), it never improves things. And again, if we are going to start segregating based on perceived nuisances, picking children as easy targets is not only discriminatory against them, but also discriminatory against parents. Everyone thinks everyone else is getting preferential treatment and they seek to equalize it through this kind of machination. Maybe we can all stop feeling like victims long enough to acknowledge that life is not fair and that there needs to be a focus on real injustice instead of perceived injustice.

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      • Yes, yes, yes. Do you follow The Abrasive Embrace? She has an excellent post today related to this theme.

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        • I do follow AE – I’ll have to check it out later. A little behind on blog reading, so I’m playing catch up. Thanks for letting me know.

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  20. Scream louder, I like it. 🙂 Other than pump you up, you have to laugh. It continues to get more and more insane every day!
    Agreed.

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    • The planet is getting more crowded every day – we’re going to all need our own bubble pods if we want to avoid annoying each other!

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  21. I feel a good number of people just want a “People Free” zone. It’s rather narcissistic to think that we should all not have to “deal” with other people in the world. I agree that other people can be unpleasant, but who has the right to decide that their convenience is so much more important than any one else s. It’s so annoying….and I feel entitled not to have to do with any of these intolerant people…ever again. Oops….It’s easy to fall into bad habits when we forget that we are as sinful and intolerant as the next person if we don’t try to counteract that with a little empathy.

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    • I laughed at your comment about intolerance that quickly spiraled into…intolerance. I think that happens to me, too! I just think what irritates each of us is subjective and to select a group, call them universally annoying and then base business policy on it seems off-putting. Even if, as one reader suggested, there is nothing wrong at first glance with charging more for various privileges, I think this is something different.

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  22. I feel so sorry for the parents of a screaming child who are the targets of nasty comments and looks. Been there, done that. It’s no fun for anyone. When did everyone become so intolerant?

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    • Thanks, Mary, for reading and commenting. Having returned from vacation surrounded by a zillion tourists, I passed the tolerance test only marginally! Like any other skill, I suppose it takes practice!

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